Because everyone should dig their job

Can a Great Resume Save You From a Bad Interview?

By Joey Trebif

Most of us have experienced a bad interview, and we all know that it can feel devastating, especially if you really wanted the job. However, just because the interview didn’t go as planned, it’s possible that you won’t automatically be ruled out as a potential candidate. If you’ve got an excellent resume, it can save you from a bad interview. There are some steps you can take before and after the interview to help increase the likelihood that you still might be able to land the job.

Do your homework before the interview:

If you haven’t done your homework and you don’t know anything about the company where you are interviewing, then you shouldn’t be on the interview.  You should do extensive research on the company and the interviewer(s) before the interview.  This information is not limited to public companies, there is a wealth of information on LinkedIn and similar sites. You should also try to find out some inside information regarding the company culture and what it’s like to work there.

Ways Your Resume Can Save You

Action Words: Action words and keywords are still the name of the game. With millions of resumes on the Internet, recruiters and hiring managers do not have time to read everything. They are drawn to specific words (and the words differ depending on the job). Many recruiters and hiring companies use resume scanning technology to identify resumes that are the best fit. Add the keywords that will draw interest in your resume.

Emphasize numbers: Rather than letting your resume be a list of responsibilities you had at previous jobs, turn it into a celebration of your successes. “Raised profits by 20 percent in one year.” “Oversaw 12 employees on my team.” “Increased productivity by replacing a task that took 1 hour each day with one that took 1 minute.” Wouldn’t you want to hire this person? I pose this as “numbers” rather than “accomplishments” because I think that you want to offer something as concrete as possible. It doesn’t have to be a number, but if you’ve got them, use them

Reasons Your Interview Went Wrong

Know Your Background Information: There have been many times when a job seeker was caught unprepared with a long application to fill out at the interview location. Come equipped with all the information you could possibly need concerning employment history, your previous addresses, dates of military service, etc.

Know Your Resume: You would be surprised how many people are not familiar with the details of their own resume. Make sure you know your own resume inside and out. It’s incredibly embarrassing to be asked specifics about a project you boasted about on the resume and respond with a blank look. Even if someone helped you write the resume, you definitely should be the expert.

Communication is a Two-Way Street: While the hiring manager will ask the questions, they expect a dialogue with the candidate. Concentrate on truly communicating with the interviewer. It starts off with a handshake and friendly greeting. There have been cases of the interviewee barely saying a word and other cases of the interviewee dominating the conversation. Slow down, relax and be yourself.

Follow Up After a Bad Interview

You should always follow up after any interview.  If the interview went well, a quick thank you note can suffice. However, if the interview went poorly, you may want to take further steps. For example, if you think you left out something that you wanted to discuss in the interview, a quick note explaining it can be appropriate. If you think the interview went poorly because of something else going on in your life, such as a recent death in the family, send a quick note explaining the situation.

Prepare for Your Next Interview

If you don’t get the job, the most important thing is to use it as a learning experience for your next interview. Update your resume to prepare for your next application and interview. If you’ve got a well-prepared resume, it can give you confidence going into your next interview.

Also, review your resume before going into an interview. Keep the information from your resume in mind to help you answer the interview questions.

The key to job success starts with a great resume. If an interview goes poorly, a well-written resume can keep you in the running for the job.